Pay attention to what I resent.

PhotoCredit: Carlos Quintero

I need to give more serious thought to what I resent and why. There are the little things–the slights, the ghosting, the rescheduled appointments.

Focusing on understanding these on a deeper level is what prepares me to work on the big things when they present themselves.

 

/This post-series is about trying to anchor my experience by exploring within and reminding myself about what it means to practice “good humaning.” It’s about moving forward imperfectly. To follow this thread in my posts, look for the tag: #NotesFromMyYogaJournal

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Back to basics

PhotoCredit: chattanongzen / Shutterstock.com

I can’t waste time with people, topics, or activities that don’t matter (to me). Such static distracts. I must always keep the basics of my practice front and center:

  • Constantly reflect on my core principles and incorporate them into my daily decision making.
  • Maintaining a healthy tension between the doing and the learning.
  • Emphasize compassion (versus selfishness, judgment, or frustration) is more important than any other practice, and I must focus that on myself, first.

 

/This post-series is about trying to anchor my experience by exploring within and reminding myself about what it means to practice “good humaning.” It’s about moving forward imperfectly. To follow this thread in my posts, look for the tag: #NotesFromMyYogaJournal

Change is happening all the time.

Photo by Daniel Cheung

Change is happening all the time, even when you feel most stuck.

There is a goal I have my eye on, and I know I’m not quite there yet.

When I’m “not quite there” I am generally hyper-focused on the barriers, the challenge, and the difficulties I have to conquer and not fully appreciating, or even noticing, the benefits of the change as I go along.

Even my language is harsh. “Conquering” leaves no room for the lightness of small wins, the encouragement of those around me, or the freedom of my own breath to flow through me.  When I have to “overcome” something, I am usually holding my breath.

Change is no small thing. It isn’t just one single decision. “Just Do It” refers to the myriad of small decisions it takes to arrive at a cumulative effect. Just…wake up earlier. Just…walk longer. Just…breath deeper. From there, add more.

Change almost always happens in stages even if we are not fully aware of them. I am not the person I was yesterday. If I learned something, I am yesterday +1.

Lasting change is almost always much more complex than a “Just Do It” and usually requires education, support systems, and ever-increasing awareness about maintaining the direction and inertia of your decisions.

If you are not quite ready to change, contemplating change, reading about the benefits of change, and seeking out support may actually be service of laying the foundation for lasting change.

In the end, it is just about putting one foot in front of the other and trying not to trip.

/This post-series is about trying to anchor my experience by exploring within and reminding myself about what it means to practice “good humaning.” It’s about moving forward imperfectly. To follow this thread in my posts, look for these tags: #NotesFromMyYogaJournal

Good Humaning: Orient toward 3 guiding causes

Photo by Pavan Trikutam

There are three causes that help us integrate lessons we are taught: a qualified teacher, an awakened mind, and supportive circumstances.

Sometimes, I think I only have one of those at a time. When I think of a “qualified teacher” I think of people I respect or who are years ahead of me in their skill. But teachers are in the people I actively ignore, who frustrate me, and annoy me, or hurt me too–and I always need reminding of that.

The inertia of life clouds my brain and I have to make a conscious effort to be present and awake to my circumstances, what I have to get done, and with whom I’m working.

Supportive circumstances, these I think I sometimes take for granted. I have a partner of a lifetime, a dog I would die for, and two cats that turn themselves into blankets for me. When I think of what I’m trying to accomplish in the world…that’s a different matter.

In reality, when I slow down enough to take stock, I have all three all the time.

Think about it for a second: When you think of putting teachings into practices, what is your lifeline?

/This post-series is about trying to anchor my experience by exploring within and reminding myself about what it means to practice “good humaning.” It’s about moving forward imperfectly. To follow this thread in my posts, look for these tags: #NotesFromMyYogaJournal

Good Humaning: The external is an illusion.

Photo by Benjamin Bousquet

Don’t be swayed by anyone’s facade.

Sick or well, rich or poor, successful or unsuccessful – reverse the logic of trying to avoid suffering or risk to seek pleasure or safety.  If you wish success for yourself, wish it for others first.

It sounds counterintuitive and even unpleasant to take on sickness, poverty or lack of success–but the more you own the unwanted in yourself, you realize all the others who are in the same circumstances.

/This post-series is about trying to anchor my experience by exploring within and reminding myself about what it means to practice “good humaning.” It’s about moving forward imperfectly. To follow this thread in my posts, look for these tags: #NotesFromMyYogaJournal

Good Humaning: Failure v Fame

Photo by Ivars Krutainis 

Whichever way you’re tipping, the goal is to stay neutral.

Whatever is happening in my life, the joyful or the painful, I can’t get swept up in the reactivity of either. High highs are fun but it takes time to settle back in again. Low lows are never fun and take a lot of energy to regain equilibrium.

Craftsmen understand this emotional pendulum well as they show up to their Craft, day in and day out. They know the thrills of solving a challenge and learning something new about a medium they’ve dedicated their lives to deepening. They know all too well the depths of frustration when problems remain unresolved and new, unpredictable constraints present themselves.

When this happens to me, I have to remember patience. I have to practice compassion. I have to regain perspective.

/This post-series is about trying to anchor my experience by exploring within and reminding myself about what it means to practice “good humaning.” It’s about moving forward imperfectly. To follow this thread in my posts, look for these tags: #NotesFromMyYogaJournal

Good Humaning: Be singular in your intention.

“My Life Through A Lens”@bamagal

Craftsmen work with a singular intention. Everything they do directly or indirectly benefit others. We benefit by the beauty they create and the standards they elevate.

If I take the attitude of wanting my work to benefit others I increase my community and kinship with the people around me.

 

/This post-series is about trying to anchor my experience by exploring within and reminding myself about what it means to practice “good humaning.” It’s about moving forward imperfectly. To follow this thread in my posts, look for these tags: #NotesFromMyYogaJournal